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What Color is Earth Day?

I hope everyone had fun breaking out the organic snacks and the biodegradable party hats for Earth Day yesterday. I noticed that the public sphere was plastered with green-tinted news, content and advertisements. For one day, at least, everything was green, grün, verde, vert, or even lu se.

But in the green hangover following the ephemeral appreciation of that infinitely complex and awe-inspiring system that is our planet, I am reminded of something I read in the Economist back in December of 2007.

“Whilst chlorophyll is, without doubt, hugely significant to life on this planet, the anthropocentric, terrestrialist view of the world that dubs those that care as “green” needs to be challenged.”

Indeed, this is referred to as “The Blue Planet” and not the green one. The Economist goes on to explain that we have consumed 90% of the world’s large fish, destroyed much of the coral and created state-sized blooms of algae. There is also an ocean warming problem that will have numerous effects that we have not even begun to think about yet. Even beyond the obvious scale of any ocean-related disasters that are brewing are the disturbing implications of problems associated with fresh water. Fresh water disasters will lead to even further complications with our beloved green-scape.

So, this year, as you put away your bright green organic hair dye and face paint, remember that being “green” is really less than 30% of a commitment to the planet. Because yesterday was “Earth Day” and not “Land Day”, I want to remind everyone that going green is great, but without adding a lot of blue, blau, azul, bleu or lan se to our palette of awareness and activity, we could be destined to serve the agenda of less favorable colors.

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What Color is Earth Day?

I hope everyone had fun breaking out the organic snacks and the biodegradable party hats for Earth Day yesterday. I noticed that the public sphere was plastered with green-tinted news, content and advertisements. For one day, at least, everything was green, grün, verde, vert, or even lu se.

But in the green hangover following the ephemeral appreciation of that infinitely complex and awe-inspiring system that is our planet, I am reminded of something I read in the Economist back in December of 2007.

“Whilst chlorophyll is, without doubt, hugely significant to life on this planet, the anthropocentric, terrestrialist view of the world that dubs those that care as “green” needs to be challenged.”

Indeed, this is referred to as “The Blue Planet” and not the green one. The Economist goes on to explain that we have consumed 90% of the world’s large fish, destroyed much of the coral and created state-sized blooms of algae. There is also an ocean warming problem that will have numerous effects that we have not even begun to think about yet. Even beyond the obvious scale of any ocean-related disasters that are brewing are the disturbing implications of problems associated with fresh water. Fresh water disasters will lead to even further complications with our beloved green-scape.

So, this year, as you put away your bright green organic hair dye and face paint, remember that being “green” is really less than 30% of a commitment to the planet. Because yesterday was “Earth Day” and not “Land Day”, I want to remind everyone that going green is great, but without adding a lot of blue, blau, azul, bleu or lan se to our palette of awareness and activity, we could be destined to serve the agenda of less favorable colors.

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Nicole Kidman at the UN

nicole_kidman1_300_400.jpg

Interpreter star and UN Goodwill Ambassador Nicole Kidman is back at the United Nations today to promote the UN’s “say no to violence against women” campaign. Most coverage of this visit, though, seems to focus on the fact that Kidman is six months pregnant–and shockingly is showing a “baby bump.” Amazing how that works.

For a more thorough account of the United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM)’s ongoing campaign to combat violence against the women, check out the website. You can even sign the petition.

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Nicole Kidman at the UN

nicole_kidman1_300_400.jpg

Interpreter star and UN Goodwill Ambassador Nicole Kidman is back at the United Nations today to promote the UN’s “say no to violence against women” campaign. Most coverage of this visit, though, seems to focus on the fact that Kidman is six months pregnant–and shockingly is showing a “baby bump.” Amazing how that works.

For a more thorough account of the United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM)’s ongoing campaign to combat violence against the women, check out the website. You can even sign the petition.

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Wednesday Morning Coffee

Top Stories

>>U.S. – Authorities announced yesterday that they had arrested Ben-Ami Kadish, a former U.S. army engineer, on charges of supplying classified documents to Israel, including information on nuclear weaponry, the F-15 fighter jet, and the Patriot missile defense system. The hand-off allegedly occurred at the army weapons research center in Dover, Del., where Kadish worked from 1979 to 1985. His handler is said to be the same who worked with Jonathan Pollard.

>>Australia – The Olympic torch has arrived in Australia, which has enacted “unprecedented” security measures to keep protesters at bay. The torch was immediately whisked to an undisclosed location and will be guarded by hundreds of police along its 10-mile relay route. Pro-Tibet demonstrators have already beamed a laser sign onto the Sydney Harbour Bridge reading “Don’t Torch Tibet,” and a group of Tibetan exiles on hunger strike just completed a nearly 50-mile march to Canberra, where they are now involved in a candle-light vigil outside the Chinese embassy.

>>Zimbabwe – China may give up on a shipment of arms to Zimbabwe, due to protests across southern Africa, which have kept the ship from docking at a suitable port. South Africa’s supreme court ruled last Friday that the arms could not be transported from Durban, the ship’s original destination, to Zimbabwe, after an Anglican bishop argued that they would likely be used to crush the opposition. South Africa’s dock workers union also said they would refuse to unload the shipment. President Mwanawasa of Zambia, head of the Southern African Development Community, called on other southern Africa nations to deny the ship harbor. It is currently idling off the east coast of southern Africa.

Yesterday in UN Dispatch

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Wednesday Morning Coffee

Top Stories

>>U.S. – Authorities announced yesterday that they had arrested Ben-Ami Kadish, a former U.S. army engineer, on charges of supplying classified documents to Israel, including information on nuclear weaponry, the F-15 fighter jet, and the Patriot missile defense system. The hand-off allegedly occurred at the army weapons research center in Dover, Del., where Kadish worked from 1979 to 1985. His handler is said to be the same who worked with Jonathan Pollard.

>>Australia – The Olympic torch has arrived in Australia, which has enacted “unprecedented” security measures to keep protesters at bay. The torch was immediately whisked to an undisclosed location and will be guarded by hundreds of police along its 10-mile relay route. Pro-Tibet demonstrators have already beamed a laser sign onto the Sydney Harbour Bridge reading “Don’t Torch Tibet,” and a group of Tibetan exiles on hunger strike just completed a nearly 50-mile march to Canberra, where they are now involved in a candle-light vigil outside the Chinese embassy.

>>Zimbabwe – China may give up on a shipment of arms to Zimbabwe, due to protests across southern Africa, which have kept the ship from docking at a suitable port. South Africa’s supreme court ruled last Friday that the arms could not be transported from Durban, the ship’s original destination, to Zimbabwe, after an Anglican bishop argued that they would likely be used to crush the opposition. South Africa’s dock workers union also said they would refuse to unload the shipment. President Mwanawasa of Zambia, head of the Southern African Development Community, called on other southern Africa nations to deny the ship harbor. It is currently idling off the east coast of southern Africa.

Yesterday in UN Dispatch

The Rest of the Story


Africa

Americas

Asia

Europe

Middle East

Leave a comment

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