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V-Day and UNICEF Team Up to Stop Rape in the Congo

Fresh off the presses from the UN News Center:

The United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and the global movement to end violence against women and girls known as V-Day have launched a new partnership to end rape in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and ensure justice for the victims of this heinous crime.

The new partnership was announced by UNICEF Executive Director Ann M. Veneman and playwright and V-Day founder Eve Ensler on Saturday during V-Day’s tenth anniversary celebrations in the United States city of New Orleans.

“The goal of the campaign, Stop Raping Our Greatest Resource, Power to The Women and Girls of Democratic Republic of Congo is to stop the rape, empower women and girls and end impunity for these atrocious crimes,” said Ms. Veneman.

Read more.

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V-Day and UNICEF Team Up to Stop Rape in the Congo

Fresh off the presses from the UN News Center:

The United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and the global movement to end violence against women and girls known as V-Day have launched a new partnership to end rape in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and ensure justice for the victims of this heinous crime.

The new partnership was announced by UNICEF Executive Director Ann M. Veneman and playwright and V-Day founder Eve Ensler on Saturday during V-Day’s tenth anniversary celebrations in the United States city of New Orleans.

“The goal of the campaign, Stop Raping Our Greatest Resource, Power to The Women and Girls of Democratic Republic of Congo is to stop the rape, empower women and girls and end impunity for these atrocious crimes,” said Ms. Veneman.

Read more.

| Leave a comment

Tuesday Morning Coffee

Top Stories

>>Zimbabwe – Yesterday the high court of Zimbabwe dismissed the opposition’s appeal for an immediate release of long-delayed results of the presidential election held late last month. In response, the Movement for Democratic Change called for a nationwide strike today, which is also when the high court is set to rule on the opposition’s objection to a government recount of votes controlling 23 seats in parliament.

>>Iraq – Richard Butler, the CBS photographer who was kidnapped two months ago in Iraq, was rescued yesterday in Basra in a raid by Iraqi soldiers. Moqtada al-Sadr claims to have negotiated his release. Iraqi reports of the incident are somewhat contradictory — one source claiming he was stumbled upon and another confirming that they acted on a tip. Bilal Hussein, an AP photographer who has been held by American forces for two years on suspicion of aiding insurgents, was also released yesterday.

>>Italy – Silvio Berlusconi’s center-right alliance won a resounding victory in parliamentary elections, according to results released yesterday. Berlusconi will become prime minister again after two years in opposition. Italy’s failing economy appears to have been the decisive factor in the election. Berlusconi owes his majority to an alliance with the right-wing Northern League that favors a federalist system and that brought down his first government in 1994. However, many small parties faired poorly in this election (the Communist Party, for the first time ever, didn’t claim a single seat), which bodes well for the stability of the government. This is Italy’s 62nd government since World War II.

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    Tuesday Morning Coffee

    Top Stories

    >>Zimbabwe – Yesterday the high court of Zimbabwe dismissed the opposition’s appeal for an immediate release of long-delayed results of the presidential election held late last month. In response, the Movement for Democratic Change called for a nationwide strike today, which is also when the high court is set to rule on the opposition’s objection to a government recount of votes controlling 23 seats in parliament.

    >>Iraq – Richard Butler, the CBS photographer who was kidnapped two months ago in Iraq, was rescued yesterday in Basra in a raid by Iraqi soldiers. Moqtada al-Sadr claims to have negotiated his release. Iraqi reports of the incident are somewhat contradictory — one source claiming he was stumbled upon and another confirming that they acted on a tip. Bilal Hussein, an AP photographer who has been held by American forces for two years on suspicion of aiding insurgents, was also released yesterday.

    >>Italy – Silvio Berlusconi’s center-right alliance won a resounding victory in parliamentary elections, according to results released yesterday. Berlusconi will become prime minister again after two years in opposition. Italy’s failing economy appears to have been the decisive factor in the election. Berlusconi owes his majority to an alliance with the right-wing Northern League that favors a federalist system and that brought down his first government in 1994. However, many small parties faired poorly in this election (the Communist Party, for the first time ever, didn’t claim a single seat), which bodes well for the stability of the government. This is Italy’s 62nd government since World War II.

    Yesterday in UN Dispatch

    The Rest of the Story


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      Take the High Road

      The Guardian UK reported today on the failure of rich nations to lead in reducing greenhouse gas emissions. In the article, Rajendra Pachauri, head of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change said, “Looking at the politics of the situation, I doubt whether any of the developing countries will make any commitments before they have seen the developed countries take a specific stand.”

      This is a big problem, especially considering that the United States has repeatedly refused to sign any international climate agreement that does not include developing nations. This decision does not rest solely in the hands of the President, however. When Bill Clinton signed on to the Kyoto protocol in 1997, the ratification was overwhelmingly voted down in the Senate because developing nations were not covered. There is a vicious cycle here that must be broken, and since we can’t control the policies of major developing emitters like India and China, it’s up to the U.S. to take the high road and step up to the challenge.

      Europe is already doing quite a bit, and the Guardian cites Germany and the U.K. as examples of positive change, but progress in these states doesn’t include emissions from aviation and shipping.

      Pointing fingers from either side gets us nowhere, but as long as developing countries can point to developed ones and talk about a lack of commitment to reducing emissions, the major changes that are needed to curb global warming are not going to happen. It is called global warming for a reason, and if we want to get everyone on board, we’re going to have to lead by example.

      | Leave a comment

      Take the High Road

      The Guardian UK reported today on the failure of rich nations to lead in reducing greenhouse gas emissions. In the article, Rajendra Pachauri, head of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change said, “Looking at the politics of the situation, I doubt whether any of the developing countries will make any commitments before they have seen the developed countries take a specific stand.”

      This is a big problem, especially considering that the United States has repeatedly refused to sign any international climate agreement that does not include developing nations. This decision does not rest solely in the hands of the President, however. When Bill Clinton signed on to the Kyoto protocol in 1997, the ratification was overwhelmingly voted down in the Senate because developing nations were not covered. There is a vicious cycle here that must be broken, and since we can’t control the policies of major developing emitters like India and China, it’s up to the U.S. to take the high road and step up to the challenge.

      Europe is already doing quite a bit, and the Guardian cites Germany and the U.K. as examples of positive change, but progress in these states doesn’t include emissions from aviation and shipping.

      Pointing fingers from either side gets us nowhere, but as long as developing countries can point to developed ones and talk about a lack of commitment to reducing emissions, the major changes that are needed to curb global warming are not going to happen. It is called global warming for a reason, and if we want to get everyone on board, we’re going to have to lead by example.

      | Leave a comment

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