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Peacekeeping Salon Participants

David Bosco is a contributing writer at Foreign Policy magazine and assistant professor at American University’s School of International Service. He is currently writing a book on the U.N. Security Council. He was senior editor at Foreign Policy between 2004 and 2006. More.
William J. Durch is a senior associate at the Henry L. Stimson Center in the Future of Peace Operations Program. Prior to joining the Center in 1990, he served in the US Arms Control and Disarmament Agency. Since joining Stimson, he has been seconded as a Scientific Advisor to the US Defense Threat Reduction Agency and served as Project Director for the United Nations Panel on UN Peace Operations (the Brahimi Report). He also serves as a consultant to the multinational Challenges of Peacekeeping project and directly for the United Nations on projects focused on improving the effectiveness of peacekeeping at headquarters and in the field. More.
Mark Goldberg is a senior contributor to American Prospect and UN Dispatch and a writer in residence at the United Nations Foundation. More.
Blake Hounshell is Web editor at Foreign Policy. He edits FP’s blog, Passport, and Web exclusives for ForeignPolicy.com. More.
Tod Lindberg is a research fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University and editor of Policy Review, Hoover’s Washington, D.C.–based bimonthly journal of essays, social criticism, and reviews on politics, government, and foreign and domestic policy. He is also the author of of The Political Teachings of Jesus, a close reading of Jesus’s Gospel statements about worldly affairs. More.
Mark Malan is the Peacebuilding Program Officer at Refugees International. He also serves as the Executive Coordinator for the Partnership for Effective Peacekeeping. From 2004 to 2006, he headed the Conflict Prevention, Management, and Resolution Department at the Kofi Annan International Peacekeeping Training Center. He also served for 20 years in the South African military, where he attained the rank of lieutenant colonel and held a variety of posts, including senior lecturer in Political Science at the South African Military Academy. More.
Eric Reeves is a professor of English Language and Literature at Smith College. He has spent the past nine years working full-time as a Sudan researcher and analyst, publishing extensively both in the US and internationally. His book about Darfur, A Long Day’s Dying: Critical Moments in the Darfur Genocide was published in May 2007. More.

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Peacekeeping Salon Participants

David Bosco is a contributing writer at Foreign Policy magazine and assistant professor at American University’s School of International Service. He is currently writing a book on the U.N. Security Council. He was senior editor at Foreign Policy between 2004 and 2006. More.
William J. Durch is a senior associate at the Henry L. Stimson Center in the Future of Peace Operations Program. Prior to joining the Center in 1990, he served in the US Arms Control and Disarmament Agency. Since joining Stimson, he has been seconded as a Scientific Advisor to the US Defense Threat Reduction Agency and served as Project Director for the United Nations Panel on UN Peace Operations (the Brahimi Report). He also serves as a consultant to the multinational Challenges of Peacekeeping project and directly for the United Nations on projects focused on improving the effectiveness of peacekeeping at headquarters and in the field. More.
Mark Goldberg is a senior contributor to American Prospect and UN Dispatch and a writer in residence at the United Nations Foundation. More.
Blake Hounshell is Web editor at Foreign Policy. He edits FP’s blog, Passport, and Web exclusives for ForeignPolicy.com. More.
Tod Lindberg is a research fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University and editor of Policy Review, Hoover’s Washington, D.C.–based bimonthly journal of essays, social criticism, and reviews on politics, government, and foreign and domestic policy. He is also the author of of The Political Teachings of Jesus, a close reading of Jesus’s Gospel statements about worldly affairs. More.
Mark Malan is the Peacebuilding Program Officer at Refugees International. He also serves as the Executive Coordinator for the Partnership for Effective Peacekeeping. From 2004 to 2006, he headed the Conflict Prevention, Management, and Resolution Department at the Kofi Annan International Peacekeeping Training Center. He also served for 20 years in the South African military, where he attained the rank of lieutenant colonel and held a variety of posts, including senior lecturer in Political Science at the South African Military Academy. More.
Eric Reeves is a professor of English Language and Literature at Smith College. He has spent the past nine years working full-time as a Sudan researcher and analyst, publishing extensively both in the US and internationally. His book about Darfur, A Long Day’s Dying: Critical Moments in the Darfur Genocide was published in May 2007. More.

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Gore Has Guts

Over on TreeHugger, I found this inspiring item. It looks like Al Gore’s got a new slideshow and some new calls to action. TreeHugger has synthesized some of the video’s key points in clips, but I definitely encourage you to spend a little over 20 minutes and watch the full video, then go change the world.

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Gore Has Guts

Over on TreeHugger, I found this inspiring item. It looks like Al Gore’s got a new slideshow and some new calls to action. TreeHugger has synthesized some of the video’s key points in clips, but I definitely encourage you to spend a little over 20 minutes and watch the full video, then go change the world.

| Leave a comment

Food Rations Cut For Three Million Darfurians

Very disturbing news out of Darfur, from The Guardian:

The World Food Programme is to halve food rations for up to 3 million people in Darfur from next month because of insecurity along the main supply routes. At least 60 WFP lorries have been hijacked since December in Sudan’s western province, where government forces and rebels have been at war for five years. The hijacks have drastically curtailed the delivery of food to warehouses ahead of the rainy season that lasts from May to September, when there is limited market access and crop stocks are depleted.

Instead of the normal ration of 500 grams of cereal a day, people in displaced persons’ camps and conflict-affected villages will only get 225 grams from next month, the UN agency said yesterday. Rations of pulses and sugar will also be halved, giving people barely 60% of their recommended minimum daily calorie intake.

The WFP said that while Sudan’s government provided security for convoys on the main supply routes, the escorts were too infrequent, given the huge demand for food at this time of year. “Attacks on the food pipeline are an attack on the most vulnerable people in Darfur,” said Josette Sheeran, the agency’s executive director. “With up to 3 million people depending on us for their survival in the rainy season, keeping WFP’s supply line open is a matter of life and death. We call on all parties to protect the access to food.”

Sheeran’s exhortation painfully underscores the urgent need for a larger and more robust peacekeeping force in Darfur. The parties responsible for disrupting WFP’s supply lines — government and rebel forces, as well as opportunistic bandits — are not going to police themselves, as severing — or appropriating — humanitarian aid is often, perversely, the exact purpose of these groups. Protecting humanitarian supply lines, then, is one area in which a neutral peacekeeping force can have an immediate impact — even before Darfur’s sputtering peace process can achieve a sustainable political solution.

At a Global Day for Darfur event here on the Mall in Washington last Sunday, Amnesty International and Tents of Hope had set up an evocative display of little baggies containing the amount of food that each Darfurian in an Internally Displaced Persons Camp receives each day. The small piles of lentils and flour were not much, and halving even that meager amount bodes very poorly indeed for the future of Darfur’s displaced.

| Leave a comment

Food Rations Cut For Three Million Darfurians

Very disturbing news out of Darfur, from The Guardian:

The World Food Programme is to halve food rations for up to 3 million people in Darfur from next month because of insecurity along the main supply routes. At least 60 WFP lorries have been hijacked since December in Sudan’s western province, where government forces and rebels have been at war for five years. The hijacks have drastically curtailed the delivery of food to warehouses ahead of the rainy season that lasts from May to September, when there is limited market access and crop stocks are depleted.

Instead of the normal ration of 500 grams of cereal a day, people in displaced persons’ camps and conflict-affected villages will only get 225 grams from next month, the UN agency said yesterday. Rations of pulses and sugar will also be halved, giving people barely 60% of their recommended minimum daily calorie intake.

The WFP said that while Sudan’s government provided security for convoys on the main supply routes, the escorts were too infrequent, given the huge demand for food at this time of year. “Attacks on the food pipeline are an attack on the most vulnerable people in Darfur,” said Josette Sheeran, the agency’s executive director. “With up to 3 million people depending on us for their survival in the rainy season, keeping WFP’s supply line open is a matter of life and death. We call on all parties to protect the access to food.”

Sheeran’s exhortation painfully underscores the urgent need for a larger and more robust peacekeeping force in Darfur. The parties responsible for disrupting WFP’s supply lines — government and rebel forces, as well as opportunistic bandits — are not going to police themselves, as severing — or appropriating — humanitarian aid is often, perversely, the exact purpose of these groups. Protecting humanitarian supply lines, then, is one area in which a neutral peacekeeping force can have an immediate impact — even before Darfur’s sputtering peace process can achieve a sustainable political solution.

At a Global Day for Darfur event here on the Mall in Washington last Sunday, Amnesty International and Tents of Hope had set up an evocative display of little baggies containing the amount of food that each Darfurian in an Internally Displaced Persons Camp receives each day. The small piles of lentils and flour were not much, and halving even that meager amount bodes very poorly indeed for the future of Darfur’s displaced.

| Leave a comment

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