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As Seen in the New York Times

Our sister site, On Day One, made the old gray lady today.

Kitchen Gardeners International, a nonprofit organization [Roger] Doiron founded in 2003, is a virtual community of 5,200 gardeners from 96 countries. “We’re trying to reframe the backyard in terms of global sustainability, without losing any of the fun,” said Mr. Doiron, who manages to make a living from donations to his nonprofit and a fellowship from the Thomas Jefferson Agricultural Institute.

He sees his audience as “people out there who are concerned about peak oil, or the gardening gastronomes who want the freshest food possible,” he said. “Or the people who joined a C.S.A.” — a community-supported agriculture project — “last year, and this year are thinking, you know what? I can do some of this myself.”

Mr. Doiron’s latest cause is challenging the presidential candidates to plant a garden on the White House lawn. He has posted his proposal, “Eat the View,” on www.ondayone.org, a Web site where people record their visions for the next president.”

The article, which appeared in the Home and Garden section today, goes on to discuss the various ways presidents through history have used the White House lawn to grow food and vegetables. Mr. Dorion’s proposal, though, is much more ambitious than what’s been done in the past. Dorion says the next president should transform the White House lawn into a garden large enough to sustain the produce needs of the White House, with the left-over produce going to local food pantries. I like the idea. And kudos to New York Times writer Anne Raver for giving it some play.

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As Seen in the New York Times

Our sister site, On Day One, made the old gray lady today.

Kitchen Gardeners International, a nonprofit organization [Roger] Doiron founded in 2003, is a virtual community of 5,200 gardeners from 96 countries. “We’re trying to reframe the backyard in terms of global sustainability, without losing any of the fun,” said Mr. Doiron, who manages to make a living from donations to his nonprofit and a fellowship from the Thomas Jefferson Agricultural Institute.

He sees his audience as “people out there who are concerned about peak oil, or the gardening gastronomes who want the freshest food possible,” he said. “Or the people who joined a C.S.A.” — a community-supported agriculture project — “last year, and this year are thinking, you know what? I can do some of this myself.”

Mr. Doiron’s latest cause is challenging the presidential candidates to plant a garden on the White House lawn. He has posted his proposal, “Eat the View,” on www.ondayone.org, a Web site where people record their visions for the next president.”

The article, which appeared in the Home and Garden section today, goes on to discuss the various ways presidents through history have used the White House lawn to grow food and vegetables. Mr. Dorion’s proposal, though, is much more ambitious than what’s been done in the past. Dorion says the next president should transform the White House lawn into a garden large enough to sustain the produce needs of the White House, with the left-over produce going to local food pantries. I like the idea. And kudos to New York Times writer Anne Raver for giving it some play.

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Thursday Morning Coffee

Top Stories

>>Russia and friends – Yesterday Russia announced its expanded support for Abkhazia and South Ossetia, two separatist republics in Georgia. The “support” falls short of full recognition, a step that Russia has threatened in response to the declared independence of Kosovo and Georgia’s bid for NATO membership, but will include direct relations and deeper trade, agriculture, education, diplomacy, and social ties, modeled after the U.S. relationship with Taiwan. Georgia’s foreign minister David Bakradze said that Georgia will seek a special session of the UN Security Council in response.

>>Olympics – Tibetans living in New Delhi greeted the Olympic torch’s arrival with protests yesterday. Over 15,000 police will guard the torch today as it continues its route through the capital, which has already been barricaded and truncated to about a third of its original five-mile length. In advance of the torch’s arrival, protesters lit an alternate torch at Ghandi’s burial spot and planned a parallel relay. Delhi police said they would allow the relay, but would extinguish any alternate torches.

>>South Korea – Yesterday South Korea announced that it would cull 3 million farm birds due to three more bird flu outbreaks. The nation has already had 15 confirmed cases of H5N1 in the last two weeks.

>>East Timor – President and Nobel laureate Jose Ramos-Horta returned home yesterday following more than two months of treatment in Australia for injuries sustained in an assassination attempt by those loyal to rebel leader Alfredo Reinado. Ramos-Horta was greeted by a military parade and thousands of supporters.

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Thursday Morning Coffee

Top Stories

>>Russia and friends – Yesterday Russia announced its expanded support for Abkhazia and South Ossetia, two separatist republics in Georgia. The “support” falls short of full recognition, a step that Russia has threatened in response to the declared independence of Kosovo and Georgia’s bid for NATO membership, but will include direct relations and deeper trade, agriculture, education, diplomacy, and social ties, modeled after the U.S. relationship with Taiwan. Georgia’s foreign minister David Bakradze said that Georgia will seek a special session of the UN Security Council in response.

>>Olympics – Tibetans living in New Delhi greeted the Olympic torch’s arrival with protests yesterday. Over 15,000 police will guard the torch today as it continues its route through the capital, which has already been barricaded and truncated to about a third of its original five-mile length. In advance of the torch’s arrival, protesters lit an alternate torch at Ghandi’s burial spot and planned a parallel relay. Delhi police said they would allow the relay, but would extinguish any alternate torches.

>>South Korea – Yesterday South Korea announced that it would cull 3 million farm birds due to three more bird flu outbreaks. The nation has already had 15 confirmed cases of H5N1 in the last two weeks.

>>East Timor – President and Nobel laureate Jose Ramos-Horta returned home yesterday following more than two months of treatment in Australia for injuries sustained in an assassination attempt by those loyal to rebel leader Alfredo Reinado. Ramos-Horta was greeted by a military parade and thousands of supporters.

Yesterday in UN Dispatch

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Don’t Go It Alone!

A very newsworthy press release from the Better World Campaign:

The Better World Campaign delivered today to the U.S. Congress a letter signed by 80 organizations calling for payment of U.S. debt to the United Nations, which at the beginning of this year amounted to more than $2.8 billion to the UN’s regular budget and peacekeeping accounts. The debt makes up 25 percent of the UN’s annual budget, and is ten times the amount owed by any other nation.

us debt to un.jpg

This letter clearly shows that the American public wants the U.S. to keep its word at the UN and stop going it alone,” said Better World Campaign Executive Director Deborah Derrick. “This Congress can begin the process of repairing U.S. financial standing at the UN when it takes up the President’s FY 2008 Supplemental Funding Request in the coming days,” she added.

The President’s FY 2008 supplemental request, expected to be taken up by the Congress the week of April 21st, includes $334 million for the UN-African Union peacekeeping mission in Darfur, Sudan, and $53 million for the UN’s political missions in Iraq and Afghanistan. The U.S. has called on the UN to take a greater role in these missions, but has not fully funded them.

For 80 organizations to sign on to a letter to Congress, the “ask” must have pretty universal appeal. Paying U.S. dues to the UN enjoys this kind of traction for very legitimate reasons: paying these dues makes sense, improves U.S. standing in the world, and is firmly in the U.S.’s interest. To emphasize these points, Better World Campaign — the sister organization of the UN Foundation, Dispatch’s sponsor — has launched its “Don’t Go It Alone” campaign, highlighting the effectiveness of working through the UN and the pressing need for the U.S. to follow up on its funding commitments.

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Don’t Go It Alone!

A very newsworthy press release from the Better World Campaign:

The Better World Campaign delivered today to the U.S. Congress a letter signed by 80 organizations calling for payment of U.S. debt to the United Nations, which at the beginning of this year amounted to more than $2.8 billion to the UN’s regular budget and peacekeeping accounts. The debt makes up 25 percent of the UN’s annual budget, and is ten times the amount owed by any other nation.

us debt to un.jpg

This letter clearly shows that the American public wants the U.S. to keep its word at the UN and stop going it alone,” said Better World Campaign Executive Director Deborah Derrick. “This Congress can begin the process of repairing U.S. financial standing at the UN when it takes up the President’s FY 2008 Supplemental Funding Request in the coming days,” she added.

The President’s FY 2008 supplemental request, expected to be taken up by the Congress the week of April 21st, includes $334 million for the UN-African Union peacekeeping mission in Darfur, Sudan, and $53 million for the UN’s political missions in Iraq and Afghanistan. The U.S. has called on the UN to take a greater role in these missions, but has not fully funded them.

For 80 organizations to sign on to a letter to Congress, the “ask” must have pretty universal appeal. Paying U.S. dues to the UN enjoys this kind of traction for very legitimate reasons: paying these dues makes sense, improves U.S. standing in the world, and is firmly in the U.S.’s interest. To emphasize these points, Better World Campaign — the sister organization of the UN Foundation, Dispatch’s sponsor — has launched its “Don’t Go It Alone” campaign, highlighting the effectiveness of working through the UN and the pressing need for the U.S. to follow up on its funding commitments.

| Leave a comment

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