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Blog Roundup #108

A sampling of United Nations related blog commentary Air America Radio notes renewed calls for Guantanamo's closure. CJR Daily discusses the "Elephant in the Newsroom" known as Guantanamo: "A quick Lexis-Nexis search for "Guantanamo" proves just how inadequate newspapers have been to the task of telling this story. Nearly every article that appears is a breaking news story about a new hunger strike, a court battle over forced feeding, or an organization like the UN voicing concern about the detainees." Coalition for Darfur links to an AP piece describing "thousands of civilian deaths" documented in Darfur. Joshua Landis writes: "The new UN investigation into Rafiq Al Hariri's murder is expected to indict Syrian leaders." Paper Chase says that "UN rights experts call on Egypt to preserve independent judiciary."
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Blog Roundup #107

A sampling of United Nations related blog commentary Armchair Generalist writes, "The United Nations Monitoring, Verification and Inspection Commission (UNMOVIC) has released a historical summary on Iraq's chemical weapons program that documents its start in 1971 and follows the work conducted through the 1980s and 1990s. At the Washington Note, Jeremy Kahn posts an interesting entry about "non-verbal politics". Treehugger covers the UN's World Environment Day: "This year they chose to highlight something we don't hear about often enough: Natural deserts and drylands also need to be protected. These areas that most people consider to be almost "dead" are in fact vital ecosystems." Michelle Malkin posts another anti-UN diatribe with a headline that tells you everything about her level of discourse: "Hey, U.N.: Boo-Freaking-Hoo."
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Blog Roundup #106

A sampling of United Nations related blog commentary Tony Ferguson previews World Environment Day. Steve Clemons suggests that "Iran will continue to try and split the five UN Security Council members." Abhi at Sepia Mutiny blogs about AIDS in India. Derek Chollet discusses Tony Blair's "far-reaching" ideas for UN Reform. Captain's Quarters, a leading conservative blog, uses a standard anti-UN tactic: make gross generalizations about UN peacekeepers from a few bad examples. Captain Ed might want to take a look at this RAND study (pdf) which suggests the UN is better suited for peacekeeping missions than the U.S., finding it not only more efficient but also more effective. Instapundit links to a Max Boot piece rebutted here by UN Dispatch's new featured blogger, Mark Goldberg. Spork in the Drawer has more on Boot: "Boot conveniently fails to note that mercenaries don't fall under any laws or rules." (Hat tip: Busy, Busy, Busy)
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Blog Roundup #105

A sampling of United Nations related blog commentary Coalition for Darfur on Darfur's "fleeting moment" Daily Kos's Navy Vet Terp on John Bolton at the Baltimore Council on Foreign Affairs Paper Chase on the UN Committee Against Torture report Peter Levine on political participation and economic success PSD Blog on UNSG Kofi Annan and the announcement of the launch of new UN Principles of Responsible Investment
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Blog Roundup #102

A sampling of United Nations related blog commentary Americablog: "Sudan peace deal closer, but not quite there - All parties have agreed to the peace deal except for the rebels who are pressing for more time. What is especially significant here and what should be recognized as an extremely positive move is that the African Union has been the key player during these negotiations. For too many years, the AU stood by and did nothing while Africa drifted into chaos and genocide. It would be nice to see the AU take a stand against thugs like Mugabe but like they say, Rome wasn't built in a day. With oil money in play, pulling together a serious consensus in the UN is going to be difficult so the AU's role here is critical."
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Blog Roundup #101

A sampling of United Nations related blog commentary Sudan Watch: Just in from Reuters via Scotsman: the UN Security Council voted today to impose sanctions on four Sudanese accused of abuses in the Darfur conflict - excerpt of report by Evelyn Leopold: "The vote on a US-drafted resolution was 12 to 0 with three abstentions -- Russia, China and Qatar, the only Arab member of the 15-nation council. The sanctions, a travel ban and a freeze on assets abroad, were the first adopted against individuals involved in the Darfur war."
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Blog Roundup #100

A sampling of United Nations related blog commentary Opinio Juris: "The United Nations Security Council has unanimously passed Resolution 1664, which calls for Kofi Annan to begin negotiating with the Lebanese government to establish an international tribunal to try the individuals responsible for the murder of former Lebanese Prime Minister Rafiq Hariri and 22 others in May, 2005. Annan has suggested to the Security Council that the tribunal be modeled on the hybrid courts in Sierra Leone, East Timor, and Cambodia, although he recommends that the tribunal not be located in Lebanon because of "concerns of security, perceptions of objectivity." According to diplomatic sources, Cyprus is considering hosting the tribunal."