Something truly remarkable in African history and global affairs occurred on June 26 when Eritrean leaders flew to the capitol of Ethiopia for peace talks. This was the first a high level meeting between these erstwhile foes in nearly twenty years, and the government of Ethiopia rolled out the red carpet for the visiting Eritrean dignitaries.

It would appear that after decades of hostility, peace is breaking out between Ethiopia and Eritrea.  This is an incredible turn of events. In the late 1990s,  the two countries fought a brutal war and despite a ceasefire agreement, the two countries remained actively hostile to each other.

That seems to be changing —  and quickly.

On the line with me to discuss this detente between two previously irreconcilable foes is Michael Woldermairam, an Assistant Professor of International Relations and Political Science at the Pardee School of Global Studies at Boston University. We discuss the roots of the conflict between Eritrea and Ethiopia, and why this easing of tensions appears to be happening now.

If you have 20 minutes and want to learn why this is such a pivotal moment for peace in this part of Africa, then have a listen.

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